Zimbabwe: Aquaculture

  • 27  of  283

Item Preview

Item Actions

Uploaded on:
04/03/2022 09:30:48
Type:
Video
File Size:
359.05 MB
Extension:
mp4
Dimensions:
1920 x 1080 pixels
Duration:
3 minutes 16 seconds
128 views 5 downloads

Details

ID: 25195
Original Filename: FAO - Zimbabwe Aquaculture 20210128.mp4
Title: Zimbabwe: Aquaculture
Description:

Aquaculture in Zimbabwe is struggling to reach its full potential despite the technical progress. FAO started a project to improve food security and contribute to poverty reduction, as well as stimulate economic growth across this landlocked nation.

 [more like this...]
License type: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO
Credit: FAO
Size (cm): 359.05 MB; 1920 x 1080 pixels; 3 minutes 16 seconds;
Orientation: Landscape
Date Created: 28/01/2022 00:00:00
Dopesheet:

According to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), aquaculture in Zimbabwe is struggling to reach its full potential despite the technical progress.

FAO started a project to improve food security and contribute to poverty reduction, as well as stimulate economic growth across this landlocked nation.

The project is a part of the global initiative called FISH4ACP, an innovative programme, devised with the Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States (OACPS) and to be implemented by FAO.

The initiative will invest in value chains to stimulate inclusive growth, bolster food security and minimize impacts on the marine environment.

FAO’s Gilles VanDeWalle said, “fish is very important for the economies of the countries of these regions as a source of food, as a source of income, as a source of livelihood, as a source of job. But the fisheries and aquaculture sectors have not been able to reach the full potential that they could in these in these regions and not only have not been able to reach the growth that it could have, but as well the benefits that they generate do not always reach those communities that need the most.”

In Zimbabwe per capita fish consumption (2.6 kg) is significantly below the average in other Southern African states (6 kg).

At the same time Nile tilapia, the main aquaculture product of the country, has a higher price than in many other African nations with retail prices hitting 3 USD per kilo, twice the regional average, making it unaffordable for many people.

Consumption of tilapia in Zimbabwe can be increased significantly if production costs can be decreased to reduce retail prices.

Hafra Nanhanga, tilapia farmer, said: “When I entered into the tilapia farming, I thought it was an easy thing to do, especially when we started on the construction of ponds. I thought we can just use our pits, our walls to make the ponds. But later om, I discovered that there was a need for big machineries like excavators.”

FISH4ACP initiative aims to unlock the potential of smallholder fish farmers using sustainable practices and scaling-up production by improving access to the technical know-how.

The goal is to make fisheries and aquaculture value chains in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific more sustainable.

The United Nations General Assembly has declared 2022 the International Year of Artisanal Fisheries and Aquaculture.

FAO is the lead agency for celebrating the year in collaboration with other relevant organizations and bodies of the United Nations system.
 

Shotlist:
STORY: ZIMBABWE / FISH FARMERS
TRT: 03:16
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT FAO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 21 JANUARY 2022, ROME, ITALY / 20-30 OCTOBER 2021, KAROI/KARIBA, ZIMBABWE
SHOTLIST
20 OCTOBER 2021, KARIBA, ZIMBABWE, LAKE HARVEST FISH FARM

1. Wide shot, Lake Harvest aquaculture ponds
2. Med shot, boat in an aquaculture pond
3. Close up, worker feeding fishes
4. Med shot, fish in a cage eating
5. Med shot, worker grading fish at “Lake Harvest” factory
6. Close up, fish grading machine

30 OCTOBER 2021, KAROI, ZIMBABWE, EDEN FARM FISH FARM

7. Wide shot, Hafra Nanhanga feeding fish with a worker
8. Close up, hand feeding fish
9. Med shot, fish farmer feeding fish
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Hafra Nanhanga, tilapia farmer:
“When I entered into the tilapia farming, I thought it was an easy thing to do, especially when we started on the construction of ponds. I thought we can just use our pits, our walls to make the ponds. But later on, I discovered that there was a need for big machineries like excavators.”
11. Med shot, fish farmer feeding fish
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Hafra Nanhanga, tilapia farmer:
“With my family, we work together almost every day. It's like we're a puzzle.

20 OCTOBER 2021, KARIBA, ZIMBABWE, LAKE HARVEST FISH FARM

13. Ponds of Harvest Lake, sunset
14. Tariro Chari walking along the ponds watching the sunset
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Tariro Chari, Lake Harvest General Manager:
“Tthe fish stay on the water for anything from six to nine months, and then they grow up to 300, to 600 grams, or 800 grams, depending on what a customer might require.”
16. Med shot, worker breeding eggs at farm hatchery
17. Close up, workers measuring eggs
18. Close up, worker moving eggs from a bucket to a bigger one
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Tariro Chari, Lake Harvest General Manager:
“But the biggest issue for any tilapia farmer is feed, so feed constitutes 60% of your cost of production.”

30 OCTOBER 2021, KAROI, ZIMBABWE, EDEN FARM FISH FARM

20. Pan left ponds
21. Med shot, fish farmer feeding fish
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Hafra Nanhanga, tilapia farmer:
“So, my dream is to make this place a training hub, a ‘hands on place’ for all those who wish to do aquaculture in Zimbabwe.”

FILE - ROME, ITALY

23. Wide shot, FAO headquarters
24. Close up, FAO logo

21 JANUARY 2022, ROME, ITALY

25. SOUNDBITE (English) Gilles VanDeWalle, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Division:
“Fish is very important for the economies of the countries of these region as a source of food, as a source of income, as a source of livelihood, as a source of job. But the fisheries and aquaculture sectors have not been able to reach the full potential that they could in these in these regions and not only have not been able to reach the growth that it could have, but as well the benefits that they generate do not always reach those communities that need the most.”

20 OCTOBER 2021, KARIBA, ZIMBABWE, LAKE HARVEST FISH FARM

25. Various shots, fish farmers at work, lake

21 JANUARY 2022, ROME, ITALY

26. SOUNDBITE (English) Gilles VanDeWalle, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Division:
“We want to work from the boat, or the net if you want, to the plate, to the consumers. So we want to work from the, with the fishers and with the fish farmers all the way through the value chains to reach the consumer and to make sure that these value chains can reach the potential that they should”.

20 OCTOBER 2021, KARIBA, ZIMBABWE, LAKE HARVEST FISH FARM

27. Wide shot, ponds at sunset