Sao Tome and Principe: Artisanal Fisheries

  • 27  of  283

Item Preview

Item Actions

Uploaded on:
03/03/2022 13:21:48
Type:
Video
File Size:
461.98 MB
Extension:
mov
Dimensions:
1920 x 1080 pixels
Duration:
3 minutes 15 seconds
297 views 7 downloads

Details

ID: 25167
Original Filename: unifeed220131c.mov
Title: Sao Tome and Principe: Artisanal Fisheries
Description:

Overfishing, biodiversity loss, and COVID-19 pandemic-related restrictions have further exacerbated the precarious condition of many people relying on small-scale fisheries. 

 [more like this...]
License type: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO
Credit: FAO
Country: Sao Tome and Principe
Size (cm): 461.98 MB; 1920 x 1080 pixels; 3 minutes 15 seconds;
Orientation: Landscape
Date Created: 31/01/2022 00:00:00
Dopesheet:

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), overfishing, biodiversity loss, and COVID-19 pandemic-related restrictions have further exacerbated the precarious condition of many people relying on small-scale fisheries.

FAO is working in Sao Tome and Principe with artisanal fishers and fishmongers to support their livelihoods, promote healthy diets, and make fisheries more sustainable.

Artisanal fisheries play an important role in food security and nutrition, poverty eradication and natural resource management, and achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

In Sao Tome and Principe, fisheries are mainly artisanal and focused on coastal pelagics, including flying fish and frigate tuna.

The sector represents a crucial revenue source for low-income families after cacao.

At least 35 coastal communities depend on inshore pelagic fishing; the sector employs 3,000 artisanal fishermen and 2,500 female fishmongers, generating a value of 24 million dollars.

Edmilsom Bonfim, fisherman from the town of Pantufo, has seen a reduction of the fish population off the coasts of Sao Tome and Principe in recent years. He said, “many species that we used to capture can’t be caught anymore.”

The COVID-19 related restrictions have increased the vulnerability of numerous people employed in fish transformation and sales.

One of them is Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos who has a shop at the Bobo Forro market where she sells dried salted fish. She said, “everything was shut down so a lot of fish got spoiled because we couldn’t sell it.”

The economic downturn caused by the pandemic continues to affect Maria Olga’s economic activity. She explained, “I spend a lot on transport, and sometimes I get here and don’t even sell one kilo of fish.”

FAO is committed to strengthening artisanal fishing activities, ensuring sustainability in the use of resources, and contributing to achieving the SDGs.

FAO’s Nicole Franz explained that about 40 percent of the global capture fisheries production from inland and marine fisheries comes from small-scale fisheries. She added that “maybe, more importantly, they provide employment for 60 million people. And if we also consider people that are fishing for subsistence and if we in addition, consider also the household members of all of these people, then about 500 million people actually depend at least partially on small scale fisheries for their livelihoods.”

In a continent like Africa, where the population has high growth rates, fish can represent an excellent source of essential nutrients for many people who need food.

Franz added, “In Africa, small-scale fisheries are very important in marine fisheries, but also in inland fisheries, in the in the Big African Lake Region, for example, they provide not only the local consumers with highly nutritious food but also all the consumers in the regions, for example, that greatly benefit, for example, from small, dried fish that is in particularly important for the nutrition of the of the more vulnerable parts of the populations.”
 

Shotlist:
STORY: SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE / ARTISANAL FISHERIES
TRT: 3:15
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT FAO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: PORTUGUESE / NATS

DATELINE: 25 JANUARY 2022, ROME, ITALY / 4 OCTOBER 2021, SAO TOME/BOBO FORRO, SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE
SHOTLIST
4 OCTOBER 2021, SÃO TOMÉ, SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

1. Various shots, Edmilsom Bonfim, fishermen, driving boats and fishing
2. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Edmilsom Bonfim, fisherman:
“I come from a fishing family. Since my grandfather and my father. I'm married and I have four children”
3. Med shot, Edmilsom Bonfim driving a boat
4. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Edmilsom Bonfim, fisherman:
“All my life I have lived off fishing.”

4 OCTOBER 2021, BOBO FORRO MARKET, SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

5. Med shot, fish being put in a bucket
6. Close up, fish in a bucket
7. Various shots, fish, market

4 OCTOBER 2021, SÃO TOMÉ, SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

8. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Edmilsom Bonfim, fisherman:
“Many species that we used to capture can’t be caught anymore.”

4 OCTOBER 2021, BOBO FORRO MARKET, SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

9. Pan left, market
10. Med shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos, fish shop
11. Close up, hand opening a door
12. Med shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos, fish shop
13. Close up, hands weighting salted fish
14. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos, fishmonger:
“Everything was shut down so a lot of fish got spoiled because we couldn’t sell it.”
15. Med shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos weighting salted fish
16. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos, fishmonger:
“I make a living processing and selling salted fish.”
17. Med shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos putting salted fish in a bag
18. Med shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos giving a bag to a customer
19. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos, fishmonger:
“My day-to-day work is a bit difficult because I live far away.”
20. Close up, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos
21. Med shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos stopping a moto taxi
22. SOUNDBITE (Portuguese) Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos, fishmonger:
“I spend a lot on transport and sometimes I get here and don’t even sell one kilo of fish.”
23. Med shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos putting salted fish in a bag
24. Wide shot, Maria Olga Andrade dos Ramos being paid by a customer at the market

FAO HEADQUARTERS, ROME ITALY - FILE

25. Med shot, United Nations’ flag
26. Zoom out, FAO Headquarters

25 JANUARY 2022, FAO HEADQUARTERS, ROME ITALY

27. SOUNDBITE (English) Nicole Franz, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Division:
“Small-scale fisheries have a wide variety of functions. They obviously also produce a large amount of fish. In fact, about 40 percent of the global capture fisheries production from inland and marine fisheries is coming from small-scale fisheries. But maybe more importantly, they provide employment for 60 million people. And if we also consider people that are fishing for subsistence and if we in addition, consider also the household members of all of these people, then about 500 million people actually depend at least partially on small scale fisheries for their livelihoods.”

4 OCTOBER 2021, BOBO FORRO, SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

28. Close up, fish being put in a bucket
29. Close up, fish for sale at the market

25 JANUARY 2022, FAO HEADQUARTERS, ROME ITALY

30. SOUNDBITE (English) Nicole Franz, FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Division:
“In Africa, small-scale fisheries are very important in marine fisheries, but also in inland fisheries, in the in the Big African Lake Region, for example, they provide not only the local consumers with highly nutritious food, but also all the consumers in the regions, for example, that greatly benefit, for example, from small, dried fish that is in particularly important for the nutrition of the of the more vulnerable parts of the populations.”
31. Wide shot, fishermen sailing
32. Wide shot, a sailboat