Blue Growth in Cabo Verde

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Uploaded on:
28/12/2021 13:53:34
Type:
Video
File Size:
1.16 GB
Extension:
mp4
Dimensions:
1920 x 1080 pixels
Duration:
8 minutes 9 seconds
295 views 19 downloads

Details

ID: 24810
Original Filename: CaboVerde.mp4
Title: Blue Growth in Cabo Verde
Description:

The African island nation of Cabo Verde - an archipelago of ten islands off the coast of western Africa, is extremely vulnerable to the effects of climate change and climate-related disasters, which has a direct impact on food and nutrition security and livelihoods. Small island developing states such as Cabo Verde are best poised to develop and promote economically viable, technically feasible and culturally acceptable development strategies that support marine ecosystem conservation and sustainable use of the oceans. 

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License type: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 IGO
Credit: FAO
Country: Cabo Verde
Size (cm): 1.16 GB; 1920 x 1080 pixels; 8 minutes 9 seconds;
Orientation: Landscape
Date Created: 22/05/2017 13:53:22
Dopesheet:

SUGGESTED STORYLINE

The African island nation of Cabo Verde - an archipelago of ten islands off the coast of western Africa, is extremely vulnerable to the effects of climate change and climate-related disasters, which has a direct impact on food and nutrition security and livelihoods. Small island developing states such as Cabo Verde are best poised to develop and promote economically viable, technically feasible and culturally acceptable development strategies that support marine ecosystem conservation and sustainable use of the oceans. 

Cabo Verde has been very receptive to FAO’s Blue Growth Initiative, and has worked alongside FAO to develop a Blue Growth Charter. 

SOT Remi Nono Womdim, FAO Representative, Cabo Verde (French):

Since the beginning, this work was done in partnership. We adopted a participative approach with the principal actors, meaning those who are directly involved in the marine ecosystem.

Furthermore, the Charter aims to maximize economic and social benefits for its population, and fully engages key sectors as partners, including fisheries and aquaculture, seafood industry, marine and coastal tourism, scientific research and shipping. 

SOT Amante da Rosa, Cabo Verde Permanent Representative to FAO (Portuguese):

The Charter allows us to take advantage, through adequate legislation and investment, of the enormous potential of Cabo Verde’s economy. This stems from the economy of the natural resource surrounding it – the sea.

Cabo Verde is located in an area rich with fisheries resources. Sadly, a combination of a lack of proper infrastructure and hygiene (including the difficulties of producing ice when electricity is not consistently available) and poor internal transportation routes means that most of the tourists staying on the islands of Sal and Boa Vista are consuming fish flown in from Europe, primarily Portugal. 

SOT Aginaldu Dias, President, Santa Maria Fishermen’s Association (Portuguese):

Lots of tourists tell us that they eat fish without taste and it’s because they are imported. But every day we have fresh fish here on the pier. The hotels just have to send someone here to the pier to buy fresh fish.

Improving fisheries management and fisheries practices, reducing fish waste

Fishing practices need to be improved, alongside eco-labeling and better hygiene. Small-scale fishermen rarely have the capacity to produce ice, but working to improve simple technologies and certifying their products, improving handling, alongside improving internal transport lines, would help to fetch small-scale fishermen higher prices and cater to the hotel industry, allowing them to offer local fish on their menus. 

SOT Tchuca Mindis, Fish vendor (Portuguese): 

We need a proper space. Nobody wants to come to the pier in the sun to sell fish. If we have a market with good conditions, refrigeration and ice, we will leave the pier. 

Without consistent access to electricity and the ability to make ice, much fish spoils in transport. This would require improvement and consistent standards across the archipelago. There are possibilities of developing co-management fishing systems between the town and its small-scale fishing communities. 

SOT Edelmira Carvalho, National Department of Maritime Economy (Portuguese): 

There is a problem with waste because many communities can't conserve the catch so much of it is lost. 

SOT Manuel Montero, Adjunct Administration President, FRESCOMAR (Portuguese):

At this time the company is overseeing itself because Cabo Verde does not have an industrial culture. That is being defined now and there are difficulties because there is a lack of legislation for industrial operations. So that is a problem but we are working to resolve it with the Ministry of Economy and Employment and the Department of Labor.

Developing stronger marine and environmental research

The Blue Growth initiative is also about strengthening research opportunities in the country. One of them is the development, alongside the university of Praia, of a research center for ecosystems, the impacts of climate change, and Atlantic Ocean research. Such an institute would offer opportunities to European researchers to carry out research in an interesting ecological zone. The center would also provide opportunities for young researchers to find challenging work in the region (thereby providing incentives to remain in Cabo Verde), and could help to fuel important research for marine zones, fisheries resources, conservation of endangered species, and climate change.

SOT Carlos Montero, Marine biologist, National Institute of Fisheries Development (Portuguese): 

We should encourage research so that we can exploit our resources within the limits of sustainability in order to promote the blue economy. Blue Growth requires changing slightly our habits to exploit resources while being mindful of the ecosystem and promoting other value chains and activities.

Strengthening the tourism sector

As for the tourism sector, Cabo Verde has 500 000 citizens, and approximately 500 000 tourists who visit its island annually. This number could be increased with an expanded tourism sector and improved internal transportation links. Diving and kite surfing facilities could be better developed for tourists, and alongside ecotourism policies, including extended marine protected areas, would help to market Cabo Verde as a more appealing tourist destination. 

SOT: Julio Lopes, Mayor of Sal (Portuguese): 

In terms of exploiting maritime resources, we have fishing activities, and we have tourism activities. In Cabo Verde, tourism includes more than sun, beaches, and nautical sports.

Strengthening the tourism sector will create more employment opportunities, especially for young people, allow locals to start small businesses and therefore addressing migration in making it a choice and not a necessity.

More info on the Blue Growth Initiative: http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/newsroom/docs/BlueGrowth_LR.pdf

Shotlist:

SHOTLIST

1. Fishing boats in Santa Maria, Sal

2. Fishing excursion out of Palmeira, Sal

3. Fishing excursion out of Tarrafal, Santiago

4. Industrial fishing boat in Mindelo, Sao Vincente

5. Tourists recreating on the beach in Santa Maria, Sal

6. Shot of fish in water in Santa Maria, Sal

7. Shell on beach in Sao Pedro, Sao Vincente

8. Industrial fishing boats in Mindelo, Sao Vincente

9. Beach in Praia, Santiago

10. Sea front outside Mindelo, Sao Vincente, with shipwreck

11. Fishermen casting and guiding nets off the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

12. Fishing boat at sea off the coast of Palmeira, Sal

13. Man selling shells on the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

14. Fish vendors on the streets of Espartos, Sal

15. Worker in the FRESCOMAR tuna processing plant in Mindelo, Sao Vincente

16. Beach in Santa Maria, Sal

17. Fish swimming around tourist’s legs in Parda, Sal

18. Kid playing in water and a skimboarder on the beach of Santa Maria, Sal

19. Tourist fishing boats in Santa Maria, Sal

20. Tourists taking photos of fisherman preparing fish for sale on the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

21. Fisherman preparing fish for sale on the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

22. Fish vendor carrying a large fish on the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

23. Pier in Santa Maria, Sal

24. Tourists passing in front of fish vendors on the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

25. Fish vendors selling fish out of a wheelbarrow on the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

26. Fish vendor emptying fish waste from wheelbarrow on the pier in Santa Maria, Sal

27. Fishermen pushing a boatload of fish onto shore in Tarrafal, Santiago

28. Porters carrying fish from boats to trucks in Tarrafal, Santiago

29. Worker pulling carts of tuna in the FRESCOMAR tuna processing plant in Mindelo, Sao Vincente

30. Tuna on conveyor belt in the FRESCOMAR tuna processing plant in Mindelo, Sao Vincente

31. Workers preparing tuna for canning in the FRESCOMAR tuna processing plant in Mindelo, Sao Vincente

32. Worker supervising canning process in the FRESCOMAR tuna processing plant in Mindelo, Sao Vincente

33. Port in Praia, Santiago

34. Tourist and guide wading into water goes underwater in Parda, Sal

35. Fisherman holding a line during a fishing excursion out of Palmeira, Sal

36. Fisherman pulling a fish into the boat during a fishing excursion out of Palmeira, Sal

37. Fisherman letting out nets into ocean during a fishing excursion out of Tarrafal, Santiago

38. Diver jumping into water during a fishing excursion out of Tarrafal, Santiago

39. Fish swimming into nets during a fishing excursion out of Tarrafal, Santiago

40. Tourists waiting to go fishing on pier in Santa Maria, Sal

41. Sunrise from pier in Santa Maria, Sal

42. SOT Remi Nono Womdim, FAO Representative, Cabo Verde (French):

Since the beginning, this work was done in partnership. We adopted a participative approach with the principal actors, meaning those who are directly involved in the marine ecosystem. 

43. SOT Amante da Rosa, Cabo Verde Permanent Representative to FAO (Portuguese):

The Charter allows us to take advantage, through adequate legislation and investment, of the enormous potential of Cabo Verde’s economy. This stems from the economy of the natural resource surrounding it – the sea.

44. SOT Aginaldu Dias, President, Santa Maria Fishermen’s Association (Portuguese):

Lots of tourists tell us that they eat fish without taste and it’s because they are imported. But every day we have fresh fish here on the pier. The hotels just have to send someone here to the pier to buy fresh fish.

45. SOT Tchuca Mindis, Fish vendor (Portuguese): 

We need a proper space. Nobody wants to come to the pier in the sun to sell fish. If we have a market with good conditions, refrigeration and ice, we will leave the pier. 

46. SOT Edelmira Carvalho, National Department of Maritime Economy (Portuguese): 

There is a problem with waste because many communities can't conserve the catch so much of it is lost. 

47. SOT Manuel Montero, Adjunct Administration President, FRESCOMAR (Portuguese):

At this time the company is overseeing itself because Cabo Verde does not have an industrial culture. That is being defined now and there are difficulties because there is a lack of legislation for industrial operations. So that is a problem but we are working to resolve it with the Ministry of Economy and Employment and the Department of Labor.

48. SOT Carlos Montero, Marine biologist, National Institute of Fisheries Development (Portuguese): 

We should encourage research so that we can exploit our resources within the limits of sustainability in order to promote the blue economy. Blue Growth requires changing slightly our habits to exploit resources while being mindful of the ecosystem and promoting other value chains and activities.

49. SOT: Julio Lopes, Mayor of Sal (Portuguese): 

In terms of exploiting maritime resources, we have fishing activities, and we have tourism activities. In Cabo Verde, tourism includes more than sun, beaches, and nautical sports.